Top Facts Exciting Advancements and Way to Participate in Psoriasis Action Month

Top Facts, Exciting Advancements and Ways To Participate in Psoriasis Action Month

Psoriasis, an autoimmune disease, affects the lives of nearly 8 million Americans, or 2.2 percent of the population. Around the globe, the disease affects 125 million people, and 10 to 30 percent of the population develops psoriatic arthritis.

August is Psoriasis Awareness Month

Each August, the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) unites its community in a show of support, celebration and dedication. They join together around a common commitment to finding a cure for psoriatic disease. This year in particular, those suffering from the disease and those supporting them bond over a shared spirit of resilience and empathy.

Some Facts about Psoriasis According to the National Psoriasis Foundation:

  • 33% of psoriasis patients report social interactions are impacted
  • 59% report the condition is a problem in their everyday lives
  • 52% are dissatisfied with treatment
  • 72% are overweight or obese, increasing the risk of other chronic conditions
  • Affects some cultures more than others, and psoriasis disproportionately impacts more Caucasians than any other race
  • Worldwide, psoriasis is most common in northern European and least common in eastern Asia.

Ways to Participate in Psoriasis Awareness Month

Whether you make a donation to help fund collaborative, transformational research, or you dust off the old 10-speed and ride the neighborhood on PsO Virtual Active Day, the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) thanks you for your participation and for choosing to be a member of this vibrant, inclusive community.

Help NPF Increase Contributions to Research

Despite the myriad challenges that 2020 has had in store for us all, NPF has awarded $3.28 million in research grants. In the near future, they plan to contribute even more. That is only possible with the help of people like you, who want to see advances in treatment and, ultimately, an end to psoriatic disease.

Get Active and Support the NPF Mission

August 22nd is your chance to get active, in any way you choose, and to join in with the community virtually. Walk, run, swim, jump rope, pogo, tango, summersault… you get the idea. The best part is you get to raise vital funds to support NPF’s efforts, all from the comfort and safety of your own home or neighborhood.

What advice does an NPF virtual event veteran participant have for you? “Do it! Show up! Don’t be worried about what you can or can’t do,” says Kendra Clement. “The NPF family is for everyone and being ‘present’ is the only important part. Everyone is here to support each other like the true community we are!”

Uncover More Knowledge

The NPF Patient Navigation Center has prepared a set of resources designed to help you live your best life with psoriatic disease. These up to date guides are intended to help you learn more about treatment options, overall health and how those suffering can set themselves up for success at their next appointment.

Among the timeliest elements is the fully updated telemedicine guide. You can experience a successful health care provider visit over the phone, tablet or computer, and with the NPF’s tips and best practices, you might even learn to love the innovations of telemedicine as an option for care.

And if you have questions about your psoriasis – and let’s be honest, who doesn’t? – our free Psoriasis Q and A webinar on August 18 may have the answers. If you can’t be there live, simply register today, and you will receive a link to view the webinar any time you would like.

Do It Your Way

No matter how you choose to participate in Psoriasis Action Month, we encourage you to get involved and connect with this incredible community during these challenging times. This is a fantastic opportunity to show your support for those with psoriatic disease, and we thank you in advance for your gift.

Driving discovery, creating community

For more than 50 years, the NPF has been driving efforts to cure psoriatic disease and improve the lives of those affected. But there’s still plenty to do! Learn how you can help their advocacy team shape the laws and policies that affect people with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis – in your state and across the country.

Help them raise funds to support research by joining Team NPF, where you can walk, run, cycle, play bingo or create your own fundraising event. If you or someone you love needs free, personalized support for living a healthier life with psoriatic disease, contact their Patient Navigation Center. And keep the National Psoriasis Foundation going strong by making a donation today.

Together, we will find a cure.

What Is Psoriasis?

Psoriasis is a skin disorder that causes skin cells to multiply up to 10 times faster than normal. This makes the skin build up into bumpy red patches covered with white scales. They can grow anywhere, but most appear on the scalp, elbows, knees, and lower back.

Psoriasis is a serious and life-altering condition for many people. While it cannot be passed from person to person, it does sometimes happen in members of the same family.

Psoriasis usually appears in early adulthood. For most people, it affects just a few areas. In severe cases, psoriasis can cover large parts of the body. The patches can heal and then come back throughout a person’s life.

Symptoms

The symptoms of psoriasis vary depending on the type you have. Some common symptoms for plaque psoriasis — the most common variety of the condition — include:

  • Psoriasis Plaques of red skin, often covered with silver-colored scales. These plaques may be itchy and painful, and they sometimes crack and bleed. In severe cases, the plaques will grow and merge, covering large areas.
  • Disorders of the fingernails and toenails, including discoloration and pitting of the nails. The nails may also crumble or detach from the nail bed.
  • Plaques of scales or crust on the scalp.
  • People with psoriasis can also get a type of arthritis called psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain and swelling in the joints. The National Psoriasis Foundation estimates that between 10% to 30% of people with psoriasis also have psoriatic arthritis.
  • Psoriasis tends to run in families, but it may be skip generations. For instance, a grandfather and his grandson may be affected, but not the child’s mother.

Things that can trigger an outbreak of psoriasis include:

  • Cuts, scrapes, or surgery
  • Emotional stress
  • Strep infections
  • Medications, including
  • Blood pressure medications (like beta-blockers)
  • Hydroxychloroquine, antimalarial medication

Diagnosis

Physical exam. It’s usually easy for your doctor to diagnose psoriasis, especially if you have plaques on areas such as your:

  • Scalp
  • Ears
  • Elbows
  • Knees
  • Belly button
  • Nails

Your doctor will give you a full physical exam and ask if people in your family have psoriasis.

Lab tests. The doctor might do a biopsy — remove a small piece of skin and test it to make sure you don’t have a skin infection. There’s no other test to confirm or rule out psoriasis.

Treatment

Psoriasis has been a well-recognized skin condition for many years, and there has been noteworthy progress over the last decade on effective therapeutic models and treatment modalities for this autoimmune condition. Some slow the growth of new skin cells, and others relieve itching and dry skin.

Your doctor will select a treatment plan that is right for you based on the size of your rash, where it is on your body, your age, your overall health, and other things. Common treatments include:

  • Steroid creams
  • Moisturizers for dry skin
  • Coal tar (a common treatment for scalp psoriasis available in lotions, creams, foams, shampoos, and bath solutions)
  • cream or ointment (a strong kind ordered by your doctor. Vitamin D in foods and pills has no effect.)
  • Retinoid creams

Treatments for moderate to severe psoriasis include:

  • Light therapy. A doctor shines ultraviolet light on your skin to slow the growth of skin cells. PUVA is a treatment that combines a medicine called psoralen with a special form of ultraviolet light.
  • Methotrexate . This drug can cause bone marrow and liver disease as well as lung problems, so it’s only for serious cases. Doctors closely watch patients. You will have to get lab tests, perhaps a chest X-ray, and possibly a liver biopsy.
  • Retinoids. These pills, creams, foams, lotions, and gels are a class of drugs related to vitamin A. Retinoids can cause serious side effects, including birth defects, so they’re not recommended for women who are pregnant or planning to have children.
  • Biologic treatments. These work by blocking the body’s immune system (which is overactive in psoriasis) to better control the inflammation from psoriasis. Biologic medications include adalimumab (Humira), brodalumab (Siliq), certolizumab pegol (Cimzia) etanercept (Enbrel), guselkumab (Tremfya), infliximab (Remicade), ixekizumab (Taltz), risankizumab-rzaa (SKYRIZI), secukinumab (Cosentyx), tildrakizumab (Ilumya), and ustekinumab (Stelara).
  • An enzyme inhibitor. The medication apremilast (Otezla) is a new kind of drug for long-term inflammatory diseases like psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. It’s a pill that blocks a specific enzyme, which helps to slow other reactions that lead to inflammation.

Late last month (July 16th), The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) published an article titled “Trial of Roflumilast Cream for Chronic Plaque Psoriasis.” The article discusses a clinical trial in which researchers tested the use of Roflumilast cream, which contains phosphodiesterase type 4 (PDE-4) inhibitor, as a potentially viable and sustainable topical treatment modality for plaque psoriasis. The study describes that 331 patients were randomized: “109 were assigned to roflumilast 0.3% cream, 113 to roflumilast 0.15% cream, and 109 to vehicle [placebo] cream.” The results indicated that “Roflumilast cream administered once daily to affected areas of psoriasis was superior to vehicle cream in leading to a state of clear or almost clear at 6 weeks.” However, the authors explicitly conclude that “Longer and larger trials are needed to determine the durability and safety of roflumilast in psoriasis.” This is often the case with new and cutting-edge therapies—larger and well-repeated, evidence-backed trials are required in order to truly understand a treatment’s efficacy and safety.

Another fascinating research trial by Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) was published yesterday, describing the use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to help control psoriasis-related activity at the genetic level. The article explains that using siRNA based therapies on the skin has traditionally been challenging, given the compound’s instability and the skin’s barrier function. However, in this study, the authors claim that they found a way to effectively deliver the treatment molecule into the skin, resulting “in down-regulation of psoriasis-related signals.” Though more testing will be required to fully determine the safety and efficacy of this treatment model, this new development may potentially open the doors to a new way of delivering topical medications.

Is There a Cure?

There’s no cure, but treatment greatly reduces symptoms, even in serious cases. The good news is that there are many things you can proactively do to improve your health and well-being and get your psoriasis under control.  Recent studies even suggested that when you better control the inflammation of psoriasis, your risk of heart disease, stroke, metabolic syndrome, and other diseases associated with inflammation go down.

Living With Psoriasis

If you have psoriasis, you know that it can affect much more than your skin. Psoriasis can have a serious emotional impact on those who suffer from this often painful and embarrassing condition. The symptoms can cause stress and anxiety, which can further exacerbate flare-ups and cause depression.

With such a wide variety of symptoms and presentations, patients must ultimately consult with trained and certified medical professionals on what treatment and therapy is best for their specific situation. If you are living with psoriasis and are ready to get help with your condition, there are many things that you can do to feel better. You can start by finding the board-certified dermatologist nearest you. If you have had treatment for your psoriasis in the past, but have not been satisfied with the results, it could be worthwhile to try working with a new doctor.

“Treatment options for psoriasis have come a long way in recent years, and I work with each patient as an individual to tailor a treatment plan specifically to their lifestyle and goals” says Dr. Donnelly, a board-certified dermatologist with Forefront Dermatology in Carmel, Indiana. “Through a combination of lifestyle changes and medications, most of my patients are able to see significant improvement in their psoriasis in as little as four to six weeks.”

Find a physician nearest you that can work with you to design a tailored treatment plan to prevent flare-ups and eliminate psoriatic disease symptoms in many cases. Make sure to bring a list of any treatments you have tried in the past, and how they worked for you. Also, it is important you discuss your personal medical history with your doctor, and any medications you may currently be taking. You should come to your appointment prepared with questions for your doctor such as:

  • What is your overall approach to the treatment of psoriasis?
  • Do you recommend lifestyle changes, such as changes to diet, exercise or supplements in addition to conventional therapies?
  • What can I do to prevent damage internally from psoriasis?
  • What are my options for long-term control of this condition?

At Cerca, we are professionals providing top talent to organizations who are leading the way in treating, preventing and curing auto-immune diseases, including psoriasis, and throughout the Life Sciences, Genomics and Genetics sectors. If you are a leader looking to expand your team with professionals who are focused on delivering work in which they take pride, and you can be proud of, ever day, then we would be privileged to help you in the process. Having been pros ourselves in the fields where we focus, we know the ins and outs of the companies, the business and the customers.

That’s a good match for any company. Partner with the group that can talk shop and gain rapport with the pros who will lead your business into the future. Just email me today at srivers@cercatalent.com, and we will begin the process of finding you Allstars that help you set records.

And join us in observing Psoriasis Action Month in one or many of the ways described above.

__________

Scott Rivers is the Managing Director of Cerca Talent+, a talent agency for the Diagnostic and Life Science Industries. Scott’s recruiting experience extends into the areas of Diagnostics, Life Sciences, Oncology and Genetics. His team manages recruitment for all levels within the commercial area of these businesses.

As a leader who has worked at all levels of commercial, medical sales and global marketing, Scott is an intense professional who works with organizations to fine tune talent branding. If you are a leader looking to expand your team with professionals who are focused on delivering work in which they take pride, and you can be proud of, every day, then Scott would be privileged to help you in the process. Having been a professional in the fields where you focus, Scott knows the ins and outs of the companies, the business and the customers you are working to come alongside.

__________

Cerca Talent+ is a full-service Executive Search Firm with a strategic focus in the areas of Clinical Diagnostics, Molecular Diagnostics and Oncology, Genomic and Genetic Medicine. Our clients choose Cerca because of our deep understanding of the industries we serve. They continue to work with us based on our extensive market knowledge, vast connections and quality of results.

We Provide Top Talent to create Peak Performance. That’s a good match for any company. Partner with the group that can talk shop and gain rapport with the pros who will lead your business into the future. Email Scott Rivers today at srivers@cercatalent.com, or call direct at 201-594-2101, and we will begin the process of finding you Top Gun Talent guaranteed to help you set records.


Sources

WebMD Medical Reference, Reviewed by Debra Jaliman, MD on June 25, 2019

Psoriasis Action Month is Here, 07/28/20, Matt Werbach

New Potential Advances In Treating Psoriasis: A Skin Condition That Affects 125+ Million People, Sai Balasubramanian, J.D.

__________

The content of this article is not implied to be and should not be relied on or substituted for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment by any means, and is not written or intended as such. This content is for information purposes only. Consult with a trained medical professional for medical advice.

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Published by

Scott Rivers

Helping clients build world class teams as a recruiting leader in Oncology, Genetics, Diagnostics and Life SciencesPublished

Each August, the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) unites its community in a show of support, celebration and dedication. They join together around a common commitment to finding a cure for psoriatic disease. This year in particular, those suffering from the disease and those supporting them bond over a shared spirit of resilience and empathy. Psoriasis, an autoimmune disease, affects the lives of nearly 8 million Americans, or 2.2 percent of the population. Around the globe, the disease affects 125 million people, and 10 to 30 percent of the global population develops psoriatic arthritis.

For more than 50 years, the NPF has driven efforts to cure psoriatic disease and improve the lives of those affected, but there’s still plenty to do! Help them raise funds to support research by joining Team NPF, where you can walk, run, cycle, play bingo or create your own fundraising event. If you or someone you love needs free, personalized support for living a healthier life with psoriatic disease, contact their Patient Navigation Center, and keep the National Psoriasis Foundation going strong by making a donation today. Together, we will find a cure.

Scott Rivers

Scott Rivers

Helping clients build world class teams as a recruiting leader in Oncology, Genetics, Diagnostics and Life Sciences

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