Perpetuating Positive Momentum on the Continuum of Inertia

Perpetuating Positive Momentum on the Continuum of Inertia

“When it rains, it pours.” Most are familiar with this phrase. It’s what we use to describe the inertia of negative circumstances building and snowballing.

Can you think of the equivalent phrase used to describe the opposite? The experience of positive inertia?

“Just look at the bright side”… “turn lemons into lemonade”… “there’s a light at the end of the tunnel!” These might come to mind, but each simply builds on turning a negative into a positive.

What about turning a positive into even more positives? Why is there no maxim for positive inertia made more commonplace?

If momentum can swing us one way or the other on the pendulum of professional success, how can we keep the continuum of inertia positioned in a positive direction?

Habits

Let’s start with a common bit of routinely espoused self-help thinking – that it takes 21 days to create a habit. If we want to focus on replicating positive momentum, we must start with an understanding of what it takes to get into a consistent pattern. The origination of the 21-day theory stems from plastic surgeon Maxwell Maltz.

In the 1960’s, Maltz released the best-selling book Psycho-Cybernetics. In it, he shares that a unique pattern occurred in his surgery patients; when the surgery resulted in an altered appearance, it took the patient around 21 days to get used to seeing their altered complexion. He also observed this in patients who had lost a limb; it would take them around the same amount of time to not feel the phantom limb before adjusting to their new situation.

Maltz’s book focused on a mind and body connection and the power of self-affirmation and mental visualization techniques. Many of his findings and the book itself were steeped in areas of personal development in which some of the very trainers and motivational speakers we know today: Zig Ziglar, Brian Tracy and Tony Robbins. However, this theory morphed from it takes a minimum of 21 days to it takes 21 days to create a habit. It’s like that game of telephone; the end story has become somewhat distorted.

In 2009, Phillippa Lally, a psychology researcher at University College London, published a study on how habits are formed. She sought out to identify how long it takes to form a habit in the real world and by doing everyday tasks. The study looked at simple acts that people could incorporate into their daily life, such as drinking a bottle of water at lunch or running for 15 minutes before dinner.

Her findings? On average it took more than 2 months before a new behavior became automatic; 66 days to be exact. Her study went on to say that it could be anywhere between 18 to 254 days — upwards of 8 months — to start and stick with a new habit!

The punchline? It takes a much longer period of time for a new habit to become your new normal.

Why is that critical to this topic? We must not regard any of the following suggestions as quick fixes, but rather as a journey to create a completely different mindset associated with maintaining a perpetually positive inertia.

Although this analysis of the continuum of inertia can span all facets of life, this issue of our Update will focus on the professional opportunities that exist for emphasis on the positive.

Autopsy

Within the workplace, it is common to diagnose negative circumstances. When a key employee left the organization, a prospective client was lost, or when a department failed to hit quarterly targets are all examples of situations in which individuals will convene to discuss what was missed, what could have been done differently, and how to avoid replicating in the future.

Have you ever done an autopsy on something that didn’t die?

How much time is dedicated to discussing what has kept individuals at your firm? Brainstorming about unique differentiators you have that allowed you to land a key account?

Just like we dissect failure to learn, we should not just set about celebrating the achievement of a quarterly target, but break down, at a granular level, what each team member did to contribute to the success of the department. As mistakes are our teachers, a great deal can be done to learn from success. If you want to create a long-term shift in perspective being of a positive nature, it requires a shift in the focus of experience.

Commitments versus Goals

An object in motion stays in motion; how is that applied within a professional setting? Consider breaking achievements into two categories – commitments and goals. A commitment is a level that is attainable; once fulfilled, it is to be celebrated, recognizing the effort it took to achieve.

But how do we keep the momentum of achievement in positive motion? The next level is the goal — the stretch target with many milestones along the way that may seem impossible to attain but is in fact doable. Delineating between the two creates a space for further momentum beyond what is expected and perpetuates the positive force of an accomplished objective.

Words Matter

As a leader, it is our responsibility to help others and understand that words have power. The way we say things matters. One could complain, “I am being bombarded with emails” or one could ask for suggestions for technology tools and effective time management.

I have to go to this team meeting = I get to go to this team meeting because I have a team dedicated to learning and living up to their fullest potential.

I have to get this proposal to our client = I want to get this proposal to our client because they trust us to solve a problem they cannot solve on their own.

I have to get caught up on emails = I want to get caught up on emails as I have knowledge and insight that others are relying on me to share with them.

I have to take the kids to practice = I get to take the kids to practice as I am fortunate to have a family and resources to help them live a full life filled with variety.

Conclusion

We have the freedom to choose our actions, our profession, our financial needs, and the path of our life. We should choose to analyze great victories and repeat them, set great working patterns and habits and improve them, establish stretch goals and commit to meeting them, and choose our speech patterns wisely.

Each professionally managed interaction and the interplay between the four takes us one step further on the journey to creating a transformed mindset associated with maintaining perpetually positive inertia.Perpetuating Positive Momentum on the Continuum of Inertia.


Scott Rivers is the Managing Director of Cerca Talent+, a talent agency for the Diagnostic and Life Science Industries. Scott’s recruiting experience extends into the areas of Diagnostics, Life Sciences, Oncology and Genetics. His team manages recruitment for all levels within the commercial area of these businesses.

As a leader who has worked at all levels of commercial, medical sales and global marketing, Scott is an intense professional who works with organizations to fine tune talent branding. If you are a leader looking to expand your team with professionals who are focused on delivering work in which they take pride, and you can be proud of, every day, then Scott would be privileged to help you in the process. Having been a professional in the fields where you focus, Scott knows the ins and outs of the companies, the business and the customers you are working to come alongside.


Cerca Talent+ is a full-service Executive Search Firm with a strategic focus in the areas of Clinical Diagnostics, Molecular Diagnostics and Oncology, Genomic and Genetic Medicine. Our clients choose to work with Cerca because of our deep understanding of the industries we serve. They continue to work with us based on our extensive market knowledge, vast connections and quality of results.

That’s a good match for any company. Partner with the group that can talk shop and gain rapport with the pros who will lead your business into the future. Email Scott Rivers today at srivers@cercatalent.com, or call direct at 201-594-2101, and we will begin the process of finding you Allstars that help you set recordsReport this

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Scott Rivers

Helping clients build world class teams as a recruiting leader in Oncology, Genetics, Diagnostics and Life Sciences

We have the freedom to choose our actions, our profession, our financial needs, and the path of our life. We should choose to analyze great victories and repeat them, set great working patterns and habits and improve them, establish stretch goals and commit to meeting them, and choose our speech patterns wisely. Each professionally managed interaction and the interplay between the four takes us one step further on the journey to creating a transformed mindset associated with maintaining perpetually positive.

Scott Rivers

Scott Rivers

Helping clients build world class teams as a recruiting leader in Oncology, Genetics, Diagnostics and Life Sciences

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